New Testament Series 2


Real people in real churches facing real dangers in anti-Christian cultures fearing the future. Sounds like the 21st century! Join Paul in this 10 course series to see how similar it was back in the 1st century and how Christians thrived despite all their problems. Listen to the hearts of Timothy, Silas, Peter, James and so many more and learn from their struggles and victories. Finally, sit down with John and hear him explain how it is all going to end. And find out who wins!


1.

The Letter to the Ephesians

Paul’s letter to the believers in Ephesus takes us on a journey through some of the most wonderful truths in the Bible concerning Christ and His church. We learn of Christ’s glorious position as the exalted Head of the church. We learn the scope of God’s cosmic plan for the church as Christ’s body and the climax of this plan in the fullness of time. And in the light of these truths we learn how we, as members of His body, should conduct our lives in a contemporary world.

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2.

The Letters to the Philippians, Colossians and Philemon

This course is a study of Paul's Letters to the saints at Philippi and Colossae and his brief note to Philemon. It explains the general meaning of each letter in a simple and understandable manner.

In the letter to the Philippians, Paul thanks the believers for their financial support and takes the opportunity to counsel them on humility and unity. This personal and affectionate letter is full of practical exhortations that are relevant for us today.

In Colossae, the believers were in danger of introducing ideas from outside of Christianity, even to the point of changing their understanding of Jesus Christ and the basis for their salvation. Paul challenges these ideas and presents the complete supremacy and sufficiency of Christ.

The letter to Philemon is a private letter that concerns the return of a slave called Onesimus to Philemon. It illustrates the change in one’s life brought about by salvation in Christ.

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3.

The Letters to the Thessalonians

Paul wrote to seven churches (or groups of churches)—Romans, Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Thessalonians. His two Thessalonian letters were probably among the very first of the inspired writings which came from his pen. Both Thessalonian letters deal with aspects of the Lord’s return and plant our feet on the highest possible ground. There can be nothing, in this life, beyond the Lord’s return.

As you engage in these studies, you will learn how the Lord’s return affects both the church and the world. You will find that the theme of the second coming of Christ is not only intensely interesting, but also extremely practical.

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4.

The Letters to Timothy and Titus

On his second missionary journey Paul found Timothy at Lystra, and because of his commendation by the brethren at Lystra and Iconium, Paul determined to take Timothy along as a member of the missionary party. Timothy became one of Paul’s closest companions, and to him Paul addressed two of his three pastoral letters. Paul gave Timothy the earliest instructions for the orderly arrangement of the local church, the qualities of leaders in the local church, and the need to teach the truth.

Titus accompanied Paul and Barnabas as part of the Antioch delegation to Jerusalem to settle problems that had arisen through legalistic attitudes.After Paul’s’ release from his first Roman imprisonment he and Titus visited Crete and Paul left Titus there to "set in order the things that are lacking and appoint elders in every city."

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5.

The Letter to the Hebrews

Many times it can be difficult to see how the sacrificial system God established in the Old Testament connects with the new covenant of grace Jesus brings in the New Testament. However the letter of Hebrews explains that the sacrificial system of the Old Testament is a picture of the ultimate sacrifice that Jesus came to fulfill. Hebrews weaves together these two realities in a profound way that shows the intricacy of God’s plan throughout history. We hope this course will help you understand the letter of Hebrews and the themes in it to grow your faith and encourage your life in Christ.

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6.

The Letter of James

The perspective taken in this study course on the Letter of James is “Faith on Trial.” Within its five short chapters, James seems to be putting our faith to the test. Is my faith genuine, or is it a cheap imitation?

D. A. Hayes comments: “The letter speaks to us where we are in language we can understand. Its short sentences go like shots straight to the mark. We feel the impact and the impress of them. There is an energy behind them and a reality in them that makes them live in our thoughts.”

The purpose of the letter is not to teach doctrine so much as to help us apply doctrine to our lives. In terms of Christ’s resurrection, for instance, it shows us how we should display the life of the risen Christ to those about us.

This study will challenge you to review your life and assess the degree to which you are living out your faith in Christ.

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7.

The First Letter of Peter

When Peter wrote this letter to believers in Asia Minor, persecution was increasing and they were under pressure to deny their faith. Peter’s letter is full of practical instruction on attitudes and behavior to strengthen their faith and witness. The world has always been (and will continue to be) hostile to Jesus Christ and His followers. In light of that, the letter of 1 Peter contains both relevant and needed teaching and encouragement for Christians today.

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8.

The Second Letter of Peter, and Jude

Peter was the most prominent of the twelve disciples of the Lord Jesus Christ. Although he became the main spokesman for the early church in Jerusalem it appears that he did not stay there but traveled among the newly planted churches, including some that the apostle Paul had established.

Peter wrote two letters to the Christians in the five provinces of Asia Minor. In his second letter to them, he warns of false teachers from within the church. He also reminds them of the basic truths of their faith and stimulates them to grow spiritually.

Jude was the half-brother of the Lord Jesus and believed on Him sometime after His death. The book of Jude is devoted entirely to the subject of apostasy, or "falling away" from the truth, and was written sometime after Peter wrote his two letters. Peter warns the believers that false teachers are coming; Jude says that they have already come.

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9.

The Letters of John

The letters of John are practical. They can be disturbing, too, for John allows no shades of gray in our lives. With him, things are black or white, right or wrong, true or false, good or bad. "God is light, and in Him is no darkness at all."

We are living in days when, so far as the world is concerned, the prevailing philosophy is that morals are relative and religion should be synthesized. John’s writings blow such fuzzy cobwebs right out of the minds of God’s people.

This study will challenge you to face squarely the absolutes of the Christian faith.

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10.

Revelation

We are living in momentous days. Even those who do not believe the Bible are using Biblical words to describe events around us. There is a feeling abroad that something has to happen, that we are moving towards some type of climax in world events. People are resorting in increasing numbers to astrologers, soothsayers and false prophets.

What does the Bible say about days such as these? Are we in the last days? Does the Bible speak with relevance and authority to today’s issues? Does it shed light on what’s to come?

It certainly does. The book of Revelation unveils what lies ahead. The student of this book will have a different outlook on today’s world and will see the events in a different and proper perspective.

A book; challenging and interesting. A book; full of imagery. A book that will excite you! Revelation!

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